Lasius fuliginosus.

Interessante und neue Themen aus "Wissenschaft und Medien"

Lasius fuliginosus.

Beitragvon Teleutotje » Donnerstag 12. März 2020, 23:25

Hallo. I want to talk about an ant. The ant is Lasius fuliginosus (Latreille, 1798), original described as Formica fuliginosa Latreille, 1798, moved to Lasius by Mayr, 1861, to Donisthorpea by Donisthorpe, 1915, to Formicina by Emery, 1916, to Acanthomyops by Forel, 1916, and to Lasius (Dendrolasius) by Ruzsky, 1912. So this ant is already known for 222 years. And this is the most important information you can find online (got this on 27/02/2020 between 10:30 and 11:30!):

On AntWeb:
“Distribution:
Geographic regions (According to curated Geolocale/Taxon lists):
Asia: Japan.
Europe: Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
Biogeographic regions (According to curated Bioregion/Taxon lists):
Palearctic.
Native to (according to species list records):
Palearctic bioregion.”
And “Distribution. Throughout Denmark and Southern Fennoscandia to latitude 62°; South Ireland, England and Wales. - Range: Portugal to Japan and North India, South Italy to Finland.
Biology. This distinctive species is easily recognised by its shining black colour and broad head. Carton nests are constructed at the base of old trees, hedgerows and sometimes in sand dunes and in old walls. Colonies are populous, often polycalic with more than one focal nest and several queens. Workers forage above ground in narrow files throughout the day and night during warm weather, ascending trees and shrubs to tend aphids. The mandibles are relatively weak but small insects may be taken as food. Other competing ant species are repelled by aromatic anal secretions. Fertilised queens may be retained in the old nest or found fresh colonies through adoption by the members of the Lasius umbratusHNS species group; mixed colonies with L. umbratusHNS or L. mixtusHNS have often been observed. Flight periods are irregular and have been recorded in all months from May to October. A number of local beetles occur with this species including members of the genus Zyras which exhibit protective mimicry. Walden (1964), records an enormous nest measuring 63 x 55 x 55 cm found in a cellar near Goteborg and there are similar reports from outbuildings and cellars in England (Donisthorpe, 1927).
Specimen Habitat Summary.
Found most commonly in these habitats: 396 times found in Unknown, 128 times found in heathlands, 128 times found in Forest, 71 times found in Anthropogenic, 45 times found in dry grassland, 35 times found in shrubs, 33 times found in Wet grassland, 31 times found in Rocks (rocky-calcareous grasslands), 21 times found in dunes & inland dunes, 2 times found in mixed woodland, ...
Found most commonly in these microhabitats: 5 times on trunk, 5 times on the ground, 2 times Nest under stone, 1 times nest in soil, 2 times foraging on ground, 1 times strays, 1 times Sobre Sambucus nigra, 1 times Sobre Alnus glutinosa, 1 times on path between trees, 1 times on car, 1 times Nido en base arbol cerca río, ...
Collected most commonly using these methods: 380 times Pitfall trap, 251 times Manual catch, 24 times search, 10 times Malaise trap, 9 times Hand, 8 times sifting of soil samples, 5 times Window trap, 5 times beating, 5 times Color trap, 3 times Yellow color trap, 3 times Pyramid trap, ...
Elevations: collected from 35 - 1750 meters, 659 meters average.”

On AntWiki:
“This species exhibits temporary social parasitism. Queens found new colonies by infiltrating an established nest of a different ant species, killing the queen and having the host workers care for her initial brood. Hosts include Lasius alienus, Lasius brunneus, Lasius mixtus, Lasius niger, Lasius rabaudi and Lasius umbratus. Lasius fuliginosus form large carton nests commonly in cavities at the base of old trees (oak, birch, willow, pine).”
And “Distribution.
Portugal to Japan and North India, South Italy to Finland (Collingwood 1979). 
Distribution based on Regional Taxon Lists.
Palaearctic Region: Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Channel Islands, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France (type locality), Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iberian Peninsula, Isle of Man, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Macedonia, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.”
And more “Biology.
This distinctive species is easily recognised by its shining black colour and broad head. Carton nests are constructed at the base of old trees, hedgerows and sometimes in sand dunes and in old walls. Colonies are populous, often polycalic with more than one focal nest and several queens. Workers forage above ground in narrow files throughout the day and night during warm weather, ascending trees and shrubs to tend aphids. The mandibles are relatively weak but small insects may be taken as food. Other competing ant species are repelled by aromatic anal secretions. Fertilised queens may be retained in the old nest or found fresh colonies through adoption by the members of the umbratus species group; mixed colonies with Lasius umbratus or Lasius mixtus have often been observed. Flight periods are irregular and have been recorded in all months from May to October. A number of local beetles occur with this species including members of the genus Zyras which exhibit protective mimicry. Waldén (1964), records an enormous nest measuring 63 x 55 x 55 cm found in a cellar near Göteborg and there are similar reports from outbuildings and cellars in England (Donisthorpe, 1927). 
Wilson (1955) - Many European observers have reported independently on various aspects of the ecology of this ant, and together they present a reassuringly consistent picture. Lasius fuliginosus nests primarily in standing tree trunks and rotting stumps, and only occasionally in and around the roots of trees, under stones, and in open soil. In a random field survey in Germany, Gosswald (1932) recorded 63 nests in wood, 2 under stones, and 5 in open soil. He found the species nesting most commonly in old poplars and willows in dry meadows. It is often locally abundant; O'Rourke (1950) notes that in Ireland it may become the dominant ant in oak woods. 
L. fuliginosus almost invariably constructs a carton nest. The composition of the carton has been analyzed by Stumper (1950), who finds that it consists primarily of macerated wood hardened with secretions from the mandibular glands. There may be some soil particles mixed in, especially in subterranean nests, but these constitute a very minor fraction. Stumper was unable to find supporting evidence for the old contention that several species of symbiotic fungi are normally grown in the carton walls. 
L. fuliginosus forages during both the day and night, forming long, conspicuous columns which usually lead to trees infested with aphids or eoceids , the excreta of these latter insects forms a principal food source for the ant. In addition, many authors have observed workers carrying dead or crippled insects back to the nests. 
Eidmann (1943) has studied overwintering in this species. A colony which he kept under observation through the autumn moved from a position in a tree bole to subterranean quarters directly beneath the tree. The winter carton nest had chambers twice the size of those in the summer nest, and its walls were conspicuously studded with grains of sand. Medium-sized and full grown larvae were found hibernating with the adults. 
Winged reproductives have been taken in the nests from May to September. The nuptial flights apparently take place earlier than in other members of the genus; literature records span the period May 4 to July 27. The flights occur mostly in the afternoon, although some authors, such as Escherich and Ludwig (1906), have suggested that they occur at night also. According to Donisthorpe (1927), the mating behavior shows early signs of parasitic degeneration. There is a marked decrease in the size difference between the two sexes, and the nuptial flight appears to have been partly suppressed. In one case Donisthorpe observed nestmates copulating on vegetation in the immediate vicinity of the parent nest. 
Donisthorpe (1922) has also reviewed the extensive literature on colony founding in this species. It has been proven without any doubt to be a temporary social parasite on Lasius umbratus (= Lasius mixtus), which species was defined in the old sense and may well include Lasius rabaudi also. Numerous mixed colonies have been found in nature, and successful adoptions of dealate queens by host colonies have been repeatedly obtained under artificial conditions. This habit places fuliginosus in the extraordinary position of being a social hyperparasite, since Lasius umbratus is parasitic itself on members of the subgenus Lasius. In more recent years, Stareke (1944) has obtained the experimental adoption of fuliginosus queens by colonies of rabaudi (= Lasius meridionalis), Lasius niger, and Lasius alienus. 
Foraging/Diet.
See the general biology discussion above for an overview of diet and foraging. Novgorodova (2015b) investigated ant-aphid interactions of a dozen honeydew collecting ants in south-central Russia. All of the ants studied had workers that showed high fidelity to attending particular aphid colonies, i.e, individual foragers that collect honeydew tend to return to the same location, and group of aphids, every time they leave the nest. Lasius fuliginosus showed no specialization beyond this foraging site fidelity. Foragers tended Chaitophorus populeti (Panzer), Cinara laricis (Hartig) and Stomaphis quercus (Linnaeus). 
Known Hosts.
Lasius fuliginosus is known to use the following species as temporary hosts: 
Lasius alienus
Lasius brunneus
Lasius mixtus
Lasius niger
Lasius rabaudi
Lasius umbratus”

And on AmeisenWiki:
“Lasius fuliginosus, im Deutschen Glänzendschwarze Holzameise oder Kartonameise genannt, ist ein örtlich gehäuft vorkommender Vertreter der Schuppenameisen in Mitteleuropa. Die Art gehört zur Untergattung Dendrolasius, was auf ihre Affinität zu Holz hinweist (griech. dendron: Baum).”
And “Verbreitung und Lebensraum.
Lasius fuliginosus ist in großen Teilen Europas und Asiens meist in Holz (z. B. morschen Baumstämmen) zu finden, reine Bodennester hingegen sind seltener. Diesem Vorzug entsprechend ist die Art meistens in Laub- und Nadelwäldern und Parks, aber auch in der Nähe größerer einzelner Bäume anzutreffen.
Koloniegründung.
Eine im Juni oder Juli schwärmende Lasius fuliginosus-Jungkönigin ist bei der sozialparasitischen Gründung auf ein bereits vorhandenes Nest der Gelben Schattenameise (Lasius umbratus) angewiesen. Da Lasius umbratus bereits eine sozialparasitäre Gründung aufweist, nennt man diese Art des Parasitismus Hyperparasitismus. Weitere mögliche Wirtsarten sind Lasius sabularum, jensi x umbratus und bicornis. 
Das Wirtsvolk muss bereits weisellos sein, darf also keine Königin mehr enthalten. Soweit bekannt finden sich in der Regel mehrere Jungköniginnen zusammen, um in das Nest der Wirtsameise einzudringen, sodass L. fuliginosus-Völker oft polygyn oder oligogyn sind. Nach einer erfolgreichen Übernahme beginnen die Gynen mit der Eiablage; die Nachkommen werden von den Lasius umbratus-Arbeiterinnen versorgt. Im Laufe der Zeit sterben die Wirts-Arbeiterinnen ab und das Nest wird nur noch von L. fuliginosus bewohnt.
Kolonie und Nestanlage.
Mit bis zu 2 Millionen Arbeiterinnen kann ein Nest sehr volkreich werden, zudem entwickeln sich mehrere Zweignester in denen jeweils auch eine oder mehrere Königinnen leben (Polygynie). Es werden jedoch anscheinend später keine Jungköniginnen aufgenommen, so dass ein Volk nach dem Tod der letzten Königin abstirbt.
Nester werden bevorzugt in morschem Holz angelegt, wobei dieses großzügig bearbeitet wird. Die Kartonnester der glänzendschwarzen Holzameise befinden sich nicht nur in und unter hohlen Baumstämmen, sondern auch in von Menschen geschaffenen Zaunpfählen, Schuppen oder Dachbalken. So kann L. fuliginosus zur Schadameise werden, obwohl Schäden bei modernen Gebäuden kaum auftreten. 
Die Kartonnester bestehen aus verschiedenen Feststoffen wie z. B. zerkautem Holz und zu fast 50% aus Zucker. Das kartonartige Gebilde ist die Grundlage für einen mit L. fuliginosus vergesellschafteten Pilz. Dieser Pilz, Cladosporium myrmecophilum (ein deutscher Name existiert nicht), überwuchert und durchdringt mit feinen Fäden die dünnen Wände und verstärkt diese so um ein Vielfaches. Die Arbeiterkaste hat zusätzlich die Aufgabe, Teile des Pilzes an neu gebauten Nestteilen anzusiedeln damit sich dieser auch dort verbreiten kann. Auch wird der Pilz von den Ameisen daran gehindert unkontrolliert das komplette Nest zu überwuchern. Der alleinige Zweck dieser Pilzzucht ist die Stabilisation der Nestwände durch die netzartige Geflechtstruktur. L. fuliginosus ernährt sich nicht von diesem Pilz wie früher irrtümlich angenommen.
Aufgaben der Arbeiterinnen.
Alte Arbeiterinnen sammeln außerhalb des Nestes Feststoffe und transportieren diese ins Nest, ebenso wird Honigtau von Rindenläusen gesammelt. Hierbei ist besonders die Art Stomaphis quercus zu nennen, die oft in den Vertiefungen der stark zerklüfteten Eichenborke von vielen Lasius fuliginosus-Arbeiterinnen umsorgt wird. Der ins Nest eingetragene Honigtau wird weiteren Arbeiterinnen übergeben, welche die Hauptaufgabe der Brutpflege übernehmen. 
Besonderheiten.
In der Nähe der Nester ist ein für den menschlichen Geruchssinn süßlicher Duft wahrnehmbar. In ihren Mandibeldrüsen produzieren die Ameisen Dendrolasin und Undekan. Diese Sekrete werden bei Störung oder Bedrohung des Nestes abgegeben. Was für den Menschen nur ein süßlicher Duft ist, ist für das Ameisenvolk eine effiziente Methode das komplette Nest in Alarmbereitschaft zu versetzen. Zudem hat dieser Geruch eine sehr starke abschreckende Wirkung auf andere Formica- und Lasius-Arten und wirkt bei diesen sogar toxisch. 
Wehrsekret Dendrolasin: Waldameisen flüchten vor Lasius fuliginosus.
Das Wehrsekret der Glänzendschwarzen Holzameise ist äußerst wirksam gegenüber anderen Ameisen. Nach Eingabe von 1-2 Handvoll Lasius fuliginosus in die Kuppel eines Nestes von Formica polyctena verlassen ein Teil der Arbeiterinnen und Königinnen sofort das Nest, Arbeiterinnen tragen auch Larven und Puppen auf die Oberfläche. Der Exodus der Waldameisen hat sogar eine deutliche Temperatursenkung im Wärmezentrum der Nester zur Folge. Dies wurde im wissenschaftlichen Experiment festgestellt.”

So, here is all the important information about this special ant…
  • 0

Teleutotje
" Tell-oo-toat-yeh "

" I am who I am , I think ... "
Benutzeravatar
Teleutotje
Mitglied
 
Beiträge: 578
Registriert: Freitag 1. August 2014, 18:01
Wohnort: Nazareth, Belgium
Bewertung: 704

Re: Lasius fuliginosus.

Beitragvon Boro » Freitag 13. März 2020, 15:03

Die im Ameisenwiki erwähnte Darstellung zur Absicherung ihres Territoriums durch L. fuliginosus deckt sich weitgehend mit den Ausführungen von Seifert in seinem Werk von 2007 und sinngemäß mit jenen im Buch von 2018. Im Wissen der Fähigkeiten v. L. fuliginosus zur Verteidigung ihres Territoriums, bin ich 2016 auf Kampfhandlungen zw. L. fuliginosus und Formica polyctena aufmerksam geworden. Ein Filmteam aus Wien hat damals eine Filmsequenz für Universum gedreht, nachdem ich auf die besonderen Umstände dieser Auseinandersetzungen aufmerksam gemacht hatte. Es kam dann aber ganz anders: Nach wochenlangen Auseinandersetzungen zwischen beiden Arten um eine Eiche, die sich im "Besitz" von fuliginosus befand und mitunter nichts an Dramatik vermissen ließ, hat sich letztlich Formica durchgesetzt. Die Volksstärke von fuliginosus wies auf ein bereits reifes Nest hin, aber der pausenlose Ansturm der Formica-Arbeiterinnen führte schließlich zur völligen Niederlage von L. fuliginosus und zum Sieg von Formica, die sofort den Baum in Beschlag nahm. Damit nicht genug, die unterlegenen Lasius- Arbeiterinnen mussten sich völlig in ihr etwa 3-4m entferntes Nest zurückziehen und blieben auch dort in der näheren Umgebung nicht ganz von streunenden Waldameisen verschont. Als "Zeichen ihres Sieges" und zur zur Absicherung des beschlagnahmten Territoriums wurde gleich neben der Eiche ein Zweignest von F. polyctena gebaut.
In diesem Fall haben Kampfgeist und eine unermessliche Quelle an Arbeiterinnen den "stark abschreckenden" und lähmenden Einsatz spezieller chemischer Waffen egalisiert und übertroffen. Wir haben damals auch Fotos gemacht:
viewtopic.php?f=46&t=1001&p=8373&hilit=Lasius+fuliginosus&sid=40ca50e6a2df38b37dedeaf0130fb6d1#p8373
  • 2

Boro
Moderator
 
Beiträge: 1438
Registriert: Mittwoch 9. April 2014, 08:13
Bewertung: 2823


Zurück zu Wissenschaft und Medien

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 16 Gäste

Reputation System ©'